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Kerrville prayer garden unfinished yet inspiring

Massive steel cross towers over Kerrville

kerrville-cross

KERRVILLE, Texas - Known as the Coming of the King Sculpture Prayer Garden, the site is unfinished for now, yet its massive steel cross high atop a hill that towers over Kerrville is said to inspire.

“People are coming here to find God and to find Christ,” said Max Greiner Jr., its architect and founder of The Coming King Foundation. “The most amazing things are happening.”

Greiner said visitors from all over the world report miracles of all kinds, “glory dust” that glitters on their hands, faces and clothing, and angel orbs that appear in the dark.

“It’s God’s presence and the peace and the joy is what’s on this mountain,” Greiner said.

The 77-foot tall “Empty Cross” is impossible to miss entering Kerrville on I-10. The 23-acre site also now has eight bronze religious sculptures that represent several million dollars in donated art, Greiner said.

He said some are situated at its entrance that opened last July.

Greiner said much like the donations that are making his vision a reality, he has faith he will find the remaining $3 million that engineers have told him is needed to upgrade the roadways and to finish the garden itself.

But Greiner said he now has the support of Bob Underwood, the owner of a AAA Landscaping, a national company based in Arizona with an office in San Antonio.

Underwood said he first saw the cross when he came to Kerrville for a triathlon and then contacted Greiner who asked for his help.

But given the downturn in the construction industry in Arizona, Underwood said, “Financially, I can’t do it. God can.”

Underwood since then his landscape architect has finished the design and work on the garden itself is set to begin this spring.

Sarah Barcenes, a visitor from Fredericksburg, said she already feels the presence of God there.

“It is that feeling that I get that maybe the Lord felt when he went to the Garden of Gethsemane to pray,” Barcenes said. “It is sacred ground, I believe.”

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