SAN ANTONIO -

The parents of 26-year-old Cara Bass began to panic when they heard the news.

“I just remember my wife bursting into the computer room telling me there’s been an explosion -- two explosions -- at the Boston Marathon,” said Cara’s father, Charles, outside their south side home.

“My heart went into my stomach,” said Sandra Bass, Cara’s mother. “And its still kind of there. I’m having a hard time calming down.”

The couple spent what seemed like a frantic eternity trying to reach their daughter, who finished the race at 2 p.m. in Boston.

This was the first time she ran the race.

“You think everything in the world that could’ve possibly gone wrong probably has,” said Charles, “but after we found she was ok we calmed down quite a bit.”

Cara was meeting up with her boyfriend, who is also from San Antonio, several streets away from the finish line when she heard the blast.

“The area we were in did get very quiet and people were exchanging looks with each other,” said Cara via telephone Monday.

She witnessed fellow runners and spectators begin to cry as they could not reach their loved ones.

“It began to get worse as minutes went by. It began to get much worse,” she said.

Back in San Antonio, Cara’s family was trying to do the same. Her parents were finally able to reach Cara on her boyfriend’s cell phone.

“She said ‘we're fine mom, we're fine, I can’t talk,’” said Sandra. “That's all I got out of her, but that’s all I needed to hear."

“They always say this is the marathon that has the biggest support from a crowd … and to see this happen here is truly devastating,” Cara said.

She says everyone she knows from San Antonio who took part in the race was not injured.

Cara adds that she will not let this attack prevent her from returning to Boston or running future marathons.

For a list of recent stories Myra Arthur has done, click here.