Intel Science Talent Search selects S.A. student as semi-finalist

Elizabeth Godfrey's project deals with aircraft engines

Published On: Jan 11 2013 09:53:37 PM CST   Updated On: Jan 11 2013 10:15:00 PM CST
SAN ANTONIO -

The Intel Science Talent Search is known as one of the oldest and most prestigious science competitions in the United States. Now, a student from San Antonio has been selected as one of 300 semi-finalists in the nationwide search.

Elizabeth Godfrey, a senior at Health Careers High School was selected from a pool of over 1700 candidates.

Godfrey said Friday she has long been interested in science, but when she learned how devastating a foreign object entering an aircraft engine can be, she said she wanted to do something about it.

"My father is an airline pilot," said Godfrey. "So, I've heard about foreign objects like birds or dust getting into aircrafts and causing damage, but I never knew how much of a big problem it was in the public sector."

Godfrey came up with a device that would prevent that type of damage to jet engines.

The project took her two years of designing and testing, but eventually she got it to where only clean air would make it i n the engine.

"I tested it in a wind tunnel that I built for myself in my garage," she said. "So, I tried it with different air speeds and tested how much it effected air speed and the environments."

Developing this design landed Godfrey a spot as one of the 300 semi-finalists in the 2013 Intel Science Talent Search.

As a semi-finalist, Godfrey will receive a $1,000 for herself and another $1,000 for her school.

She said although she is still in the competition, there is already some interest in her design.

"I've talked to somebody from Boeing," she said. "And, I've talked to somebody from Lockheed and it was in a very informal setting, but I talked to them a little bit and they are very interested in the development of what I'm doing."

On January 23, 40 of the remaining 300 semi-finalists will be invited to Washington D.C. to present their results at a conference.

The top prize there is a $100,000.

For a list of recent stories Stephanie Serna has done, click here.