BOERNE, Texas -

Deadlocked since election night, Castle Hills Assistant Fire Chief Mike Fincke and San Antonio businessman Charlie Boyd IV, who were vying for the Precinct 1 seat on the Kendall County Commissioners Court, each had 623 votes -- until Monday.

“The automatic recount has just concluded,” announced Toni Anne Daschiell, the Kendall County Republican chair, after the three-hour process at the county’s elections office.   

Daschiell declared although Fincke’s vote total was unchanged, Boyd lost by a single vote, 623 to 622.

The GOP chair said the recount discovered Boyd actually had one less paper ballot that had been miscounted by hand.

“Something was overlooked. Just a human error,” Daschiell said.

As a result, Daschiell said no roll of the dice was needed to break the tie, and with no Democratic opponent, Fincke is expected to take office Jan. 1.

“Somebody needs to pinch me and make sure this is reality. It’s actually happening,” Fincke said.

His former opponent said, “Voters spoke. It just took a few extra days to figure out.”

Daschiell said the race remain unchanged last week, after a handful of military ballots were never returned and a provisional ballot was disqualified because the voter was not registered in Precinct One.

She said after the election results are canvassed on Monday, Boyd would have ten days to file a challenge in district court.

However, Boyd said it’s not likely.

“If I maybe had some reason to challenge other than just being disappointed, but there’s no reason to tie up the courts system for me being disappointed,” Boyd said.

A political novice like Fincke who stayed for Monday’s recount, Boyd said he chose to let his representatives monitor what was happening.

Boyd said he sat in the audience at commissioners court instead.

Defeated by a single vote, Boyd said he may run again for precinct one in four years and will remain active politically.  

Boyd said the office of Kendall County Judge and two other seats on commissioners court are up for grabs in two years.

Based on his unusual first race, Boyd said he hopes “the people of Kendall County pay attention and get involved and not stay home.”

Fincke said he agrees there is a lesson to be learned.

“This is a prime example that every vote does count, so please go vote,” Fincke said.

Both said they were relieved the outcome came down to an actual ballot, instead of leaving the outcome to chance.

On the campaign trail since last fall, Fincke said, “I’m glad it’s finally over.”