SAN ANTONIO -

Among those watching San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro’s historic moment as the first Hispanic to give the keynote speech at the Democratic National Convention will be a group of seniors studying government at Jefferson High School, his alma mater.  

“It’s actually amazing thought knowing he came where we are,” said Briana Sanchez.

Alex Olmsted said, “I think it gives hope to inner city kids saying you get what you put into life.”

Others also said they see hope for themselves in Castro’s life and career.

“It really shows that it doesn’t matter where you come from, it doesn’t matter the environment,” said Lanni Hammonds. “The sky isn’t the limit. You can go as far as you want to go.”

Castro and his twin brother, Joaquin, were raised by a single mother in a working class neighborhood near St. Mary’s University. They went on to Ivy League educations, followed by each taking their own political path.

The mayor’s speech is seen by political analysts as his introduction to the same national stage that vaulted then Senator Barack Obama into presidential politics.

“I can see him in the White House one day in the future,” said Salvador Acosta.

Acosta and several of the other students agreed Castro could go a long way in closing the age gap between increasingly apathetic young voters and outspoken, conservative older voters.

Merrick Escobar said thanks to Castro, he is now considering following in his footsteps.

“I’ve always wanted to make a change in my community and the world,” Escobar said.

Escobar said he’s changed his mind about politics, “knowing that somebody who has walked these halls, who started out where I am now, has gotten as far as he has.”

In advance of Mayor Julian Castro’s keynote address at the 2012 Democratic National Convention, Obama for America released a new video featuring Castro, his twin brother, and their mother, Rosie Castro, talking about how his family’s story.

It's available to be seen here.