SAN ANTONIO -

San Antonio’s Department of Public Works is considering changes to the application and implementation processes of speed humps on area residential roads.

This after Councilman Chris Medina filed a council consideration request that directed city staff to find ways to reduce speeding in areas with large amounts of children.

The councilman filed the request just days after Brandon Abrams, 6, was killed after being hit by a speeding car while riding his bike along Autumn Sunrise Road.

Residents of the neighborhood, including Abrams’ parents, had for years petitioned the city to install speed humps.

Those humps were finally installed about two weeks ago.

“It’s just really sad that it took a child’s death for something to be done,” said Ann Alvarado, who lives on Autumn Sunrise.

The process to obtain city-funded speed humps can be arduous, however. Residents must apply with at least 10 other signatures from property owners on the street.

Public works officials then determine if the claim is valid. If they rule the claim is valid, the department then writes up a proposal for city council to consider.

The council then must vote to fund the project. But given the large amount of requests, and low amount of available funds, certain neighborhoods get passed over again and again.

“We’ve waited for years and years, and I’m frustrated to the point where maybe I’ll just make my own speed humps,” said William Duffy, who lives just two blocks from Autumn Sunrise, but has not speed humps.

The council considers several factors like proximity to school zones and neighborhood size when choosing which projects to fund.

But city officials have said they may change that policy to make sure the streets who need humps the most actually get them.

Recommendations have to be drawn up and presented to city council before any changes can be approved and put into place.

No time table for any possible changes was given.

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