UTSA student charged with hazing

Charge against Prakash Mammen, 22, stems from 2011 incident

Author: Katrina Webber, Reporter, kwebber@ksat.com
Published On: Mar 04 2013 05:14:26 PM CST   Updated On: Mar 04 2013 05:48:33 PM CST
Prakash Mammen
SAN ANTONIO -

UTSA student Prakash Mammen, 22, has been arrested on a charge of hazing, stemming from an incident that happened more than a year ago.

Mammen was taken into custody by Bexar County sheriff’s deputies Saturday afternoon.

However, according to spokesman Paul Berry, they were acting on a warrant from another agency. He said no details about the case were available through his office.

Mammen, who was reached at his home Monday morning after posting bond, also declined to talk about the case.

"I’ve got to speak to lawyers right now, but it's, kind of, a legal case. We honestly had no idea about it at all," he said, referring to his unexpected arrest. "I'm not really able to make any comments. It's, like, a national thing."

According to Mammen’s Twitter page, he is a member of the Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity, also known as SigEp.

He described himself on the internet site as someone who “drinks a lot,” and “one of the frattiest (expletives)” that you’d ever want to meet.

Joe Izbrand, Chief Communications Officer for UTSA, said federal law prohibits him from commenting on incidents that have to do with the discipline of a student.

However, he was able to confirm that, following the September 2011 incident, SigEp was banned from campus until 2015.

Izbrand also said the incident “definitely involved hazing.”

According to the website, StopHazing.org, hazing is described as “any intentional knowing or reckless act” directed against a student that endangers his/her mental or physical health or safety.

The term usually refers to illegal initiation rituals for groups such as fraternities, and can involve activities such as beating pledges, depriving them of food or sleep, or making them consume food or excess alcohol.

A 1995 law makes hazing illegal in Texas, punishable by up to 180 days in jail and fines of up to $5,000.

When hazing results in death, penalties increase to up to two years in prison and fines up to $10,000.

The law also allows for the prosecution of people who fail to report hazing.