West side residents raise concerns over neighborhood curve

Councilman Ray Lopez to consider adding speed bumps on Hickory Grove

Author: Tim Gerber , Reporter, tgerber@ksat.com
Published On: Jul 18 2012 06:01:19 PM CDT   Updated On: Jul 18 2012 06:37:21 PM CDT
SAN ANTONIO -

A West side residential street with a history of accidents grabbed the attention of a city councilman Wednesday.

District 6 Councilman Ray Lopez held a meeting with residents who live on Hickory Grove to hear their concerns about numerous accidents that have occurred on a curve in 7200 block the road.

"It's been a problem for almost 40 years," said resident Jesse Sanchez. "It's a dangerous curve. Drivers don't slow down. We have a lady that's had her mailbox knocked down six different times."

Bianca Zapata won't even let her kids play in the front yard. Others are afraid to even get their mail.

Just two weeks ago, someone smashed into a guardrail right in front of Zapata's home.

"I can't let my kids play in the yard. It's not safe," Zapata said. "It's frustrating to have property you can't utilize."

Over the years, the city has added warning signs to alert drivers to the curve. After a series of accidents earlier this year, they added yellow chevron signs.

Now the residents are asking for speed bumps.

Lopez said they could help but it won't solve the problem.

"This is really addressing a symptom," Lopez said. "We're doing the best we can with all the things we are putting into place, but unfortunately, changing driver habits is going to be a really tough thing to do but this is another component of trying to fix that."

While the speed bumps might not stop accidents from happening, the residents said they would sure make them feel better.

"Speed bumps should slow them down so if there is an accident it will be at a slower pace -- 20 or 25 mph instead of the 45 they're doing right now," Jesse Sanchez said.

Lopez told the residents it could take between six to eight months to get the speed bumps installed.

In the meantime, the city plans to change the color of the chevron signs to a more fluorescent yellow to make them more visible.

Police officers will also be sent to the area to step up patrols and write more tickets in the hopes it will get people to slow down.

For a list of recent stories Tim Gerber has done, click here.