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SOUND OFF: Should first responders pay more for health coverage?

Chamber of Commerce releasing findings of community survey

Changing the benefits of those who are sworn to protect and serve is not an easy proposition, but Wednesday Mayor Julian Castro's health care and retirement task force will recommend that the city align the benefits and health care contributions of police and firefighters with the city's civilian employees.
Changing the benefits of those who are sworn to protect and serve is not an easy proposition, but Wednesday Mayor Julian Castro's health care and retirement task force will recommend that the city align the benefits and health care contributions of police and firefighters with the city's civilian employees.

The San Antonio Chamber of Commerce is releasing findings on a survey on whether or not police and fire personnel should be asked to pay a larger share of their healthcare coverage.

The survey found that 59% of the 500 registered voters surveyed believed uniformed employees should contribute more to their healthcare costs.

Currently, San Antonio's uniformed first responders do not currently pay health insurance premiums.

We want to know what you think. Should San Antonio's police and fire personnel pay an increased share of their healthcare costs?

Click here to sound off.