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Jewish community prepares for Passover

Hate crime against Jews in Kansas City leads to security, prayers

As Passover begins across the world at sunset on Monday, many will be bowing their heads in prayer for the victims of the shootings in Kansas City on Sunday, which took the lives of three people.

As Passover begins across the world at sunset on Monday, many will be bowing their heads in prayer for the victims of the shootings in Kansas City on Sunday, which took the lives of three people.

It's believed the shootings were the work of a well-known white supremacy leader who was on numerous watch lists for threats against the Jewish community.

Police say Frazier Glenn Miller opened fire at a Jewish Community Center, killing a grandfather and his grandson. He then went to a retirement home and killed a woman who was visiting her mother.

In San Antonio, Congregation Agudas Achim is preparing for Passover by taking a closer look at the message of the religious holiday.

"It's not just about the freedom of Jews, but it's about reminding ourselves of our obligations to work for the freedom of all peoples," said Rabbi Howard Siegel. "Freedom from tyranny, freedom from persecution, freedom from terrorism. And in relation to the recent events in Kansas City, it serves as a reminder that this world is  not complete."

Passover meals are planned for Monday night at family homes, then a larger celebration will be held Tuesday at the synagogue. Security concerns are part of the order of the day.

"Unfortunately this is a concern that we have to deal with 365 days a year and we do. To say there is a greater concern now is not really true. We are always concerned," said Siegel. "Freedom from hatred and bigotry. So the awful event is not going to be a pall over the Passover celebration this year. Rather it's going to bring further meaning to our efforts."