CDC warns: Do not eat romaine lettuce; H-E-B pulls products from shelves

Consumers, retailers, restaurants urged to throw romaine lettuce away

By Julie Moreno - Executive Producer/Social Media

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is warning consumers not to eat romaine lettuce. 

There is a multistate outbreak of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (E. coli) linked to romaine lettuce. 

CDC officials are working with the Food and Drug Administration and other officials to determine the source of the outbreak. In the meantime, CDC officials say consumers should not eat any romaine lettuce, and retailers and restaurants should not serve any romaine lettuce. 

Consumers and retailers should throw away romaine lettuce even if some of it has been consumed and no one has gotten sick. The advice includes all types of romaine lettuce including salad mixes that contain romaine.

H-E-B began pulling romaine lettuce from produce shelves Tuesday night.

"H-E-B has withdrawn all romaine lettuce products from store shelves out of an abundance of caution, and the product will not scan at the check stand.  Earlier today, the Centers for Disease Control issued a national caution to consumers to avoid romaine lettuce, the product may be linked to an E coli. contamination the CDC is monitoring. H-E-B's top priority is food safety and we will restock the product when it is safe for consumption," the company said in a statement.

The CDC advises people to wash and sanitize refrigerator drawers or shelves where romaine was stored.

Health officials say the E. coli outbreak has sickened 32 people in 11 states. People in Canada are also being warned to stay away from romaine lettuce.

The strain is different than the one linked to romaine lettuce earlier this year.

If you have symptoms of an E. coli infection, CDC officials say you should write down what you ate before you got sick and contact your healthcare provider.

Go here for more information from the CDC, and here for instructions on cleaning your refrigerator after a food recall.

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