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SAQ: Coronavirus myths busted

World Health Organization setting the facts straight.

What is it? West Nile virus is an infection transmitted by mosquitoes, although in very small cases it has been spread through blood transfusions, organ transplants, breastfeeding and during pregnancy from mother to baby.
What is it? West Nile virus is an infection transmitted by mosquitoes, although in very small cases it has been spread through blood transfusions, organ transplants, breastfeeding and during pregnancy from mother to baby. (iStock)

SAN ANTONIO – You may have heard a lot of different ways to prevent yourself from getting COVID-19 or that certain climates can prevent you from getting the virus.

The World Health Organization is busting some of those myths and setting the facts straight.

Here are common myths and the correct related information that you should know:

  • Myth: Cold weather and snow cannot kill the new coronavirus.
  • Fact: There is no reason to believe that cold weather can kill the new coronavirus or other diseases.
Courtesy: World Health Organization
Courtesy: World Health Organization (World Health Organization)
  • Myth: COVID-19 virus can be transmitted in areas with hot and humid climates.
  • Fact: From the evidence so far, the new coronavirus can be transmitted in ALL areas.

A few more:

  • Myth: Are hand dryers effective in killing the new coronavirus?
  • Fact: No, hand dryers are not effective.
  • Myth: Coronavirus cannot be transmitted through mosquito bites.
  • Fact: To date, there has been no information nor evidence to suggest that the new coronavirus could be transmitted by mosquitoes.
  • Myth: Do vaccines against pneumonia protect you against the new coronavirus?
  • Fact: No, they do not provide protection against the new coronavirus.
Courtesy: World Health Organization
Courtesy: World Health Organization (World Health Organization)
  • Myth: Are antibiotics effective in preventing and treating the new coronavirus?
  • Fact: No, antibiotics do not work against viruses, only bacteria.
  • Myth: Can eating garlic help prevent infection with the new coronavirus?
  • Fact: Garlic is a healthy food but there is no evidence from the current outbreak that eating it has protected people from COVID-19

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