A different view of the Democrats on Fox News prime time

This combination photo shows, Tucker Carlson, host of "Tucker Carlson Tonight,"  left, and Sean Hannity, host of "Hannity" on Fox News. The Fox News and Fox Business channels are going international. A digital streaming service with the pair will launch in Mexico this month, expanding to Spain, Germany and the United Kingdom in September. (AP Photo)
This combination photo shows, Tucker Carlson, host of "Tucker Carlson Tonight," left, and Sean Hannity, host of "Hannity" on Fox News. The Fox News and Fox Business channels are going international. A digital streaming service with the pair will launch in Mexico this month, expanding to Spain, Germany and the United Kingdom in September. (AP Photo)

NEW YORK – Tucker Carlson and Sean Hannity are providing television viewers with a distinctly different vision of the Democratic National Convention each night from their perches on Fox News Channel.

Hannity calls the virtual convention “the worst infomercial ever made” and provides brief, annotated highlights of some Democratic speakers. Carlson said that if the Democratic National Committee was in direct marketing, it would “be bankrupt by now.”

Fox News is providing an hour of convention news coverage each night, the same as broadcast networks ABC, CBS and NBC. But as cable rivals CNN and MSNBC devote three hours in prime time to the convention — including showing the Democrats' feed virtually uninterrupted — Fox will not dislodge its biggest opinion stars.

Carlson and Hannity offer a viewpoint familiar to supporters of President Donald Trump. In the first two nights, their guests have included Donald Trump Jr., Kellyanne Conway, former White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders and Trump campaign spokeswoman Erin Perrine.

No one minces words.

Hannity called the convention “a predictable dose of poorly produced, cult-like, psychotic rage (and) hysteria against all things Donald Trump. I thought they were the uniters.”

Carlson said it is the type of programming that appeals to people who enjoy mandatory corporate diversity seminars.

“The preaching, self-righteousness, the condescension, the shameless lying, the strange mixture of guilt and aggression — it probably all felt refreshingly familiar to you,” Carlson said. “For everyone else, it was a massive turnoff.”