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South Texas Haunted Folklore: The Tale of the Haunted Railroad Tracks

Written by Michael Mayes; Adapted by David Elder

Here is the story of the Haunted Railroad Tracks, as told by author Michael Mayes:

In the late 1930s, a bus driver was bringing home a load of kids from a field trip.

It was late at night.

As he was attempting to cross the railroad tracks, the bus stalled out.

As luck would have it, a train was barreling down the tracks at high speed.

The bus driver had no chance to rouse the kids, and the bus wouldn't start or move.

There was a horrific crash. The bus was literally torn in two.

The bus driver was thrown from the wreckage and miraculously survived.

But to everyone’s dismay, all of the kids were killed instantly.

No one really blamed the bus driver for this terrible accident. It wasn't his fault. But he was racked by guilt so much, that he felt like he couldn't go on living.

Shortly thereafter, he returned to the intersection in his own private vehicle, and parked it on the tracks, waiting for the next train to come and end his life, just as the train ended the life of all the children he was responsible for.

As he sat there, he began to hear giggling and laughter, strangely familiar to his ears.

The next thing he knew, his car was being moved up hill seemingly, and across the tracks to safety.

When he got out of the car to investigate, he noticed small hand prints and fingerprints.

In his mind, it was the ghosts or the spirits of those children moving him to safety.

It was their way of telling him that they did not blame him for what happened.

He then went on and lead a productive life, guilt free.

It is said that if you go to those tracks to this day and put your car in neutral, your car will be pushed up and over the tracks to safety.

If you put baby powder on your car, you will see hand prints and finger prints on your vehicle.  

This rendition of the Donkey Lady was written by author Michael Mayes of Texas Cryptid Hunter.


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