Committee wants the word 'heroic' cut from school curriculum about Alamo defenders

Committee also recommends removing Travis letter from curriculum

By Julie Moreno

A committee tasked with recommending changes to the state's school curriculum for Texas history doesn't think the Alamo defenders should be called heroes.

The State Board of Education Social Studies TEKS Streamlining Work Groups have removed the word "heroic" in a proposed revision to the Texas history curriculum.

Texas Monthly reports that change was made because heroic is "a value-charged word."

Should students in Texas be taught that the defenders of the Alamo were heroic? Vote in the poll at the end of this article.

The committee is also recommending that students no longer be required to explain the iconic letter penned by William Barrett Travis. Known as the "Victory or Death" letter, the famous correspondence was written as an impassioned plea for reinforcements as Travis and his soldiers were besieged by Santa Anna's men.

The Texas Heritage Society says, "The Travis letter is universally regarded as one of the most heroic letters ever written." You can read the full text of the letter here.

SBOE spokeswoman Debbie Ratcliffe told Texas Monthly that the omission is aimed at streamlining and shortening the teaching of the Texas revolution and said there had been little objection to the recommendations.

This week, Gov. Greg Abbott and Texas Land Commissioner George P. Bush have taken to Twitter to voice their opposition to the changes. Both said political correctness was behind the recommendations.

The State Board of Education will hold a public hearing on the changes on Tuesday. Fittingly, the hearing will be in the William B. Travis Building.

This document reflects the TEKS Streamlining Work Groups' final recommendations as of Aug. 25, 2018:

 

 

 

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