Some things you can do now to help your child be successful later

63 percent of self-made millionaires were required to read two or more books a month

Research shows there are some habits that may increase your chances of raising a kid who turns into a successful adult.

ORLANDO, Fla. – Every parent wants their child to grow up to be a successful, productive adult. But are there some ways to make success more likely for your kid?

From the time they are tiny, parents wonder who their children will grow up to be.

Research shows there are some habits that may increase your chances of raising a kid who turns into a successful adult.

First, encourage reading! 63 percent of self-made millionaires were required to read two or more books a month by their parents.

Also, hanging out with wealthy friends may make a difference. Harvard researchers recently analyzed 21-billion friendships on Facebook and found children from low socioeconomic backgrounds who grew up with kids from high socioeconomic backgrounds had higher incomes later in life.

Requiring your child to complete chores can also set them up for success later on.

Another predictor of success? When mom works! One study found daughters of working mothers went to school longer, were more likely to be supervisors, and earned 23% more compared to their peers who were raised by stay-at-home moms.

“The reason I continue to work other than the financial stability of having two working parents is that I also want to set an example for my children to see that, you know, two parents can contribute to the home,” Lindsey Kovaleski, a working mom said.

Adult sons of working moms tended to pitch in more on household chores and childcare. With ways to help your child achieve success later on.

Another trait of parents who raise successful kids is they don’t try to micromanage their lives and do everything for them.

Making their own decisions is a critical part of growing up. Yet a poll by the New York Times found that three-quarters of parents of adults between ages 18 to 28 still book their child’s doctor appointments and haircuts for them.