‘That bill is not going to reach my desk’: Greg Abbott doesn’t support adding abortion exceptions for victims of rape, incest

Texas governor asked about San Antonio State Rep. Lyle Larson’s bill on Fox News Sunday

FILE - In this March 16, 2020, file photo, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott speaks during a news conference in San Antonio. Gov. Abbott, in defending Texas' near-ban on abortions, says women and girls who are raped won't be forced to give birth because the new law "provides at least six weeks for a person to be able to get an abortion." But that's not how pregnancy works. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)
FILE - In this March 16, 2020, file photo, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott speaks during a news conference in San Antonio. Gov. Abbott, in defending Texas' near-ban on abortions, says women and girls who are raped won't be forced to give birth because the new law "provides at least six weeks for a person to be able to get an abortion." But that's not how pregnancy works. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File) (Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.)

SAN ANTONIO – During an interview on Fox News Sunday with host Chris Wallace, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott on Sunday would not lend his support for a bill proposed by Rep. Lyle Larson, R-San Antonio, that would allow an abortion exception for victims of rape and incest.

Texas’ restrictive abortion law, which essentially bans the procedure before most women even know they’re pregnant, has been criticized for doing away with the exception.

Last week, Larson introduced a bill that would restore the exception and called on Abbott to add the issue to the agenda of the current special session. Larson, who previously voted for the near abortion ban, said he submitted the bill after listening to the concerns of its critics.

“If that (bill) came to your desk, will you sign it or not,” Wallace asked Abbott on Sunday.

“Well, we’ve go to go back to what the reason was why the law was passed in the first place. And the goal is to protect the lives of every child with a heartbeat,” Abbott said, before shifting to the state providing funding to pregnancy centers to help women.

“Are you saying that you will not sign an exception for rape or incest,” Wallace pressed.

“Well first, I gotta tell you, Chris you’re making a hypothetical that’s not going to happen because that bill is not going to reach my desk,” Abbott said. “But second, the goal is to protect every child with a heartbeat.”

Without Abbott’s blessing, the bill is unlikely to become law.

Larson’s bill has been criticized by conservatives, as well as Democrats, according to the Texas Tribune.

You can watch or read Abbott’s full interview here.

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About the Author:

Fares Sabawi has been a journalist in San Antonio for four years. He has covered several topics, but specializes in crime, courts, open records and data visualization.