CBD, hemp, medical marijuana? Here’s what you need to know about Texas’ changing pot laws.

A 2019 Texas law that legalized hemp but kept marijuana illegal has led to widespread confusion. Marjorie Kamys Cotera for The Texas Tribune

Since Texas lawmakers in 2019 legalized some forms of the cannabis plant but not others, marijuana prosecution cases around the state have been thrown into disarray, and enforcement can vary greatly depending on where you live.

A new Texas law sought to bring the state in line with a 2018 federal law that legalized hemp while keeping marijuana illegal. The result: widespread confusion.

Here’s what the new laws mean for Texans.

Hemp, marijuana and CBD: What’s the difference?

Marijuana and hemp are often indistinguishable by look or smell because they both come from the cannabis plant. The difference amounts to how much of the psychoactive compound THC, or tetrahydrocannabinol, they contain.

Marijuana is now classified as a cannabis plant or its derivatives with a THC concentration of more than 0.3%. If the substance has less THC, it’s considered hemp.

Cannabidiol, or CBD, is a nonpsychoactive compound of cannabis. Businesses may sell it throughout Texas as long as its THC concentration is less than 0.3%. Supporters claim it can alleviate conditions such as anxiety, depression and insomnia. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration doesn’t recognize any of the lofty claims, however; the agency has only approved the drug to treat two rare kinds of epilepsy through the prescription drug Epidiolex.

OK, what is legal right now?