Here are the acronyms and terms you need to know to get unemployment benefits in Texas

Getting unemployment benefits in Texas requires understanding a lot of the Texas Workforce Commission’s acronyms and terms. (Credit: Miguel Gutierrez Jr./The Texas Tribune)
Getting unemployment benefits in Texas requires understanding a lot of the Texas Workforce Commission’s acronyms and terms. (Credit: Miguel Gutierrez Jr./The Texas Tribune)

Learn more about how to navigate Texas’ unemployment system in our guide for jobless Texans.

This article is co-published with ProPublica, a nonprofit newsroom that investigates abuses of power.

Applying for unemployment aid in Texas can be like learning to read another language.

Are you on a TUC? Is it EB or HUP? Have you logged on to UBS and checked your correspondence inbox or called the Tele-Serv to find out?

Add in a slew of new acronyms stemming from emergency pandemic legislation, and things get even harder to understand. Texas’ unemployment system is confusing and frustrating. Getting familiar with these terms and acronyms may help you have an easier time accessing the benefits you are entitled to.​

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

claim and payment status page

The webpage where you can locate your claim start date, claim type, weekly benefits, deposits and payment requests online.

correspondence inbox

The mailbox attached to your online account where the TWC sends documents and communications.

DD

Direct deposit. You can choose to have your unemployment payments deposited directly into your bank account. Click here for the TWC’s direct deposit FAQ.

disqualified

If you receive notice that you’ve been disqualified from unemployment benefits, it means something has prevented you from receiving them. Common reasons for this include a problem with your reason for leaving work, refusing to accept suitable work or knowingly giving false information to obtain or increase a benefit. You can read more about disqualifications, including how to end or appeal them, here.

DUA

Disaster Unemployment Assistance. DUA is an expanded benefits program that is activated during federally declared major disasters, like hurricanes, tornadoes and wildfires. In Texas, DUA has become synonymous with Pandemic Unemployment Assistance, or PUA, during the coronavirus pandemic. While they are not technically the same thing, PUA is a form of DUA. You may see the acronyms used interchangeably, as there is no other form of DUA currently available in Texas.

EB

Extended Benefits. This state program temporarily extends benefits when the unemployment rate in Texas is 5% or greater for three months. It is available to qualified individuals who exhaust their regular unemployment claim, and it lasts up to 13 weeks. It will be listed on your claim as a type of Temporary Unemployment Benefits.

FPUC

Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation. This was the federal program behind the additional $600 weekly payment that eligible people received earlier on during the pandemic. It expired in July.

HUP

High Unemployment Period. This is another benefit extension program triggered when the unemployment rate in Texas exceeds 8% for three months.

LWA

Lost Wages Assistance. This was the federal program behind the additional $300 payments that eligible people received during late summer. It expired in September.

MBA

Maximum benefit amount. This is how much assistance, at most, you can receive during your benefit year.

PEUC

Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation. This is a federally funded program that temporarily extends unemployment benefits for up to 13 weeks for people who have exhausted their regular claims. It will be listed on your claim as a type of Temporary Unemployment Benefits. This program expires after Dec. 26, 2020.

PUA

Pandemic Unemployment Assistance. This is a federally funded program that provides up to 39 weeks of unemployment aid during the coronavirus pandemic. In Texas, PUA is considered a type of Disaster Unemployment Assistance, or DUA. While they are not technically the same thing, during the pandemic, you may see the acronyms used interchangeably, as there is no other form of DUA currently available in Texas.

Regular Unemployment Benefits

The state’s traditional unemployment aid. With a regular unemployment claim, you can receive benefits for up to 26 weeks in a year.

Reliacard

If you do not select direct deposit, the TWC sends your payment to a Visa debit card from U.S. Bank called the Reliacard. Click here for the TWC's debit card FAQ.

Tele-Center

When applying for unemployment benefits or troubleshooting your claim, you can call the Tele-Center to speak with TWC representatives and contracted agents. Business hours are 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Central time daily. Call: 800-939-6631.

Tele-Serv

An automated system you can call to check the status of your claim or request payment between 7 a.m. and 6 p.m. Central time daily. Call: 800-558-8321.

Temporary Unemployment Benefits

Programs that temporarily extend unemployment benefits are housed under this classification, including Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC), Extended Benefits (EB) and High Unemployment Period (HUP). See also: TUC.

TUC

Temporary Unemployment Claim. You may see this acronym when using the workforce commission’s online portal. Programs that temporarily extend unemployment benefits are housed under this classification, including Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC), Extended Benefits (EB) and High Unemployment Period (HUP). See also: Temporary Unemployment Benefits.

TWC

Texas Workforce Commission.

UBS

Unemployment Benefits Services. This is how the TWC refers to its online system you can use to do things like apply for unemployment, request payment and file appeals.

UI, UC, UA, UE

Unemployment insurance, unemployment compensation, unemployment assistance, unemployment. These are commonly used acronyms that all generally refer to the same thing: unemployment aid.

UI Portal

Where you can submit documents online.

WBA

Weekly benefit amount. This is what you will be paid each week you are receiving unemployment assistance.

Workforce Development Board

A group of community leaders appointed by local elected officials charged with planning and oversight responsibilities for workforce programs and services in their area. These boards work with service contractors to operate local workforce offices. You can look up your local office here.

See also: the TWC’s glossary for unemployment benefits.