Biden speaks of racial 'open wound,' contrasting with Trump

FILE - In this March 10, 2020, file photo Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden speaks to members of the press at the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia. Biden said Friday, May 29, that the "open wound of systemic racism was behind the police killing of a handcuffed black man in Minnesota, and swiped at President Donald Trump for inciting violence, without mentioning him by name. "We are a country with an open wound. None of us can turn away, Biden in a brief online address. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File) (Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.)

WASHINGTON – Joe Biden lamented the “open wound” of the nation's systemic racism on Friday as he responded to the police killing of a black man in Minnesota. He drew an implicit contrast with President Donald Trump, who has suggested authorities could respond with violence to the protests that followed George Floyd’s death.

“The original sin of this country still stains our nation today,” Biden, the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee, said in remarks broadcast from his home in Wilmington, Delaware. "It’s time for us to take a hard look at uncomfortable truths.”

Biden announced his bid for the presidency last year arguing he’s uniquely positioned to unite a deeply divided country. He pointed to Trump’s response to a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, as unworthy of America’s people and values.

As the country endures another spasm of racial unrest, the central premise of Biden’s campaign is being tested. Biden is responding by positioning himself as an empathetic counter to Trump, who often struggles to convey emotion or connect on a personal level during moments of crisis.

Biden said he spoke with Floyd’s family and demanded justice for his death while calling for “real police reform that holds all cops up to the high standards that so many of them actually meet.” The president later said that he, too, had spoken with Floyd's family and called them “terrific people.”

Trump initially condemned police actions in Floyd’s death but later agitated the unrest by tweeting that protesters could be met with violent police resistance. He threatened to take action to bring Minneapolis “under control,” called violent protesters outraged by the killing “thugs” and revived a civil-rights-era phrase fraught with racist overtones.

“When the looting starts, the shooting starts,” Trump wrote in a tweet that was flagged by Twitter as violating rules against “glorifying violence.” The White House said the president “did not glorify violence. He clearly condemned it.”

By Friday afternoon, Trump sought to acknowledge the shocking circumstances of Floyd’s death while commending law enforcement.