Police investigate after human remains found at Seguin home

By Mariah Medina - Digital Journalist, Garrett Brnger - Reporter

SEGUIN, Texas - Police are investigating after human remains were found at a home in Seguin on Sunday night. 

According to Seguin Chief of Police Terry Nichols, police were investigating a case of child abuse and neglect and while working that investigation officers received information that there may be remains at a home in the 900 block of Anderson Street.

Police searched the home and found human skeletal remains belonging to an adult in a bedroom at the home.

Nichols said it's unclear if the person died by criminal means. So far, no one has been arrested in connection with the remains. 

A woman and her teenage daughter live at the home, Nichols said.

He said the woman showed up at the home after police arrived and let them into the home. 

WATCH: Seguin police chief news conference

Officials have not yet determined the identity of the person found inside the home, adding that the person had been there for a "long time."

Residents said they are shocked by the discovery.

"It's kind of freaking me out," said Cassandra Aviles, a Seguin resident. "Like it's kind of scary, to be honest."

"We're supposed to live in a society, civilized and you know, what are we doing with a decomposed body in our house?" said Jeremiah Arevalo, a neighbor.

Seguin police, the Guadalupe County District Attorney’s Office, Texas Rangers and the Texas State University Department of Anthropology are working to determine the identity of the remains and how the individual died.

The center's director, Daniel Wescott, said the remains were "scattered all over."

"The time consuming part of it is that it's all ... you've got to locate all those remains and then map every single bone in so that you have a detailed map of where every bone is within the room," Wescott said. 

He said the next step is to take the skeleton back to the lab to do a "biological profile" to narrow down for whom they might be looking so they can start getting records.

"Then we'll also go through and analyze it to see if there's any kind of trauma or anything that might give us any indication of the manner or cause of death," Wescott said.

The basic analysis will take a week or two, but the identification will depend on what kind of records they can get, Wescott said.

According to Nichols, police have been to the house six times since the beginning of 2019 for reports of runaways, and once for a civil matter regarding vehicles in a roadway. 

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