US Supreme Court halts execution of Texas death row inmate 1 hour before he was scheduled to die

Ruben Gutierrez killed an 85-year-old mobile home park owner in Cameron County.
Ruben Gutierrez killed an 85-year-old mobile home park owner in Cameron County. (TDCJ)

HOUSTON – The U.S. Supreme Court granted a reprieve Tuesday to a Texas inmate scheduled to die for fatally stabbing an 85-year-old woman more than two decades ago, continuing a more than four-month delay of executions in the nation’s busiest death penalty state during the coronavirus pandemic.

The justices blocked Ruben Gutierrez’s execution about an hour before he could have been executed. Gutierrez’s attorneys had argued his religious rights are being violated because the prison system won’t allow a chaplain to accompany him in the death chamber.

The Texas prison system last year banned clergy from the death chamber following a Supreme Court ruling that halted the execution of another inmate, Patrick Murphy, who had requested a Buddhist adviser be allowed in the chamber. In response to the ruling in Murphy’s case, the Texas prison system changed its policy, only allowing prison security staff into the execution chamber.

CORRECTS THE EXECUTION DATE TO JUNE 16, NOT 15 - This undated photo provided by the Texas Department of Criminal Justice shows Ruben Gutierrez. Texas was set on Tuesday, June 16, 2020, to end its more than four-month delay in executions due to the coronavirus pandemic with the scheduled lethal injection of Gutierrez, a death row inmate condemned for fatally stabbing an 85-year-old woman more than two decades ago. (Texas Department of Criminal Justice via AP) (Texas Department of Criminal Justice)

“As a devout Catholic, Mr. Gutierrez’s faith requires the assistance of clergy to help him pass from life into afterlife. The Texas Department of Criminal Justice changed its policy for its own convenience, but spiritual comfort at the time of death is not a convenience; it’s a protected legal right,” Shawn Nolan, one of Mr. Gutierrez’s attorneys, said after the stay was granted.

The Supreme Court said it granted the stay pending a ruling by the high court on Gutierrez’s petition on the issue of whether to allow a spiritual adviser to accompany him in the death chamber. A decision on the petition was expected at a later date.

The Supreme Court said if it were to rule in favor of Gutierrez, it would ask a lower court to “determine, based on whatever evidence the parties provide, whether serious security problems would result if a prisoner facing execution is permitted to choose the spiritual adviser the prisoner wishes to have in his immediate presence during the execution.”

A trial in Houston federal court on Murphy’s case and whether his religious rights were violated is also still pending.