Kids wanna know: How do you get a job building rockets? 🚀 What does it take to run a business?

Students interview Andy Lapsa, CEO of Stoke Space about business, making rockets

in this week’s KSAT Kids edition of “Kids Wanna Know,” Andy Lapsa, Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of Stoke Space takes students behind the scenes to learn why he and others decided to start their company.

Editor’s note: This story was published through a partnership between KSAT and noun, an educational platform designed to provide engaging content online for students and teachers.

Hello parents, teachers and students!

Have you ever wondered what its like to run a business, especially one as advanced and complicated as a rocket-building business?

Well, in this week’s KSAT Kids edition of “Kids Wanna Know,” Andy Lapsa, Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of Stoke Space takes students behind the scenes to learn why he and others decided to start their company (videos below).

Laspa also talks about what all goes into building a rocket business and what it takes to run it.

Stoke Space Technologies is a start-up company in the space industry focused on building reusable rockets that can be flown over and over again - just like airplanes. Airplanes are currently built to fly thousands of times for years while rockets traditionally have been used to go into space only once.

Stoke Space, SpaceX and others are currently building rockets that can be flown multiple times. Stoke and SpaceX, however, have different views on leaving earth, which is something Andy talks about.

Interested in bringing noun to your school or classroom and take part in an interview? You can do so by clicking here. The animated class interviews will be shown online and in our free KSAT Kids newsletter and may also be seen in future newscasts!

Fast Facts

  • There are about three trillion trees on planet Earth, and between 100-400 billion stars, approximately, in the galaxy.
  • The Sun is large enough that approximately 1.3 million Earths could fit inside (if squashed in) or if the Earths retained their spherical shape then 960,000 would fit.
  • When Buzz Aldrin and Neil Armstrong landed on the moon in 1969 on the Apollo, they deposited a 2-foot-wide panel covered in 100 mirrors onto the surface of the moon. Astronomers today still use this panel to calculate the distance from the moon to the Earth by reflecting laser pulses in the mirrors. It’s the only experiment from the Apollo missions still running.

Check out the full interview below!

Noun enables students to explore their school subjects and interests using 20-minute live online interviews with subject-matter guests. Find more information here.


About the Author:

Ben Spicer is a digital journalist who works the early morning shift for KSAT.