62ºF

Sister of man who killed their mother relieved her brother will get mental help

Thomas Clark shot Susan Clark in 2017, found not guilty by insanity

SAN ANTONIO

Thomas Nathan Clark shot his 62-year-old mother in the head three times in 2017, killing her.

"She was coming over for lunch with me and my kids, and I was getting the house ready and everything. And all of a sudden, I saw her house on the news, and I instantly knew it was my brother," said Michelle Clark, Thomas Clark's sister.

It's now been determined that Thomas Clark was having a mental health crisis when he pulled the trigger.

"He was a gun collector, even before he went crazy. He thought she was impostor, a terrorist impostor, posing as our mom. So, he definitely needed help," Michelle Clark said.

More local news on KSAT.com:

Man pleads guilty to murders of neighbors for 50-year prison sentence

Judge denies convicted killer's new trial motion

Feds: Academy broke law by selling rifle used in Sutherland Springs church attack

She said that her mother was aware of Thomas Clarks' schizophrenia and tried many times to get him help. The last time she tried, it didn't work.

"She filed a mental health warrant a month before, and they never came and got him," Michelle Clark said.

Thomas Clark was recently found not guilty by reason of insanity. 

Michelle Clark said she feels a bit better knowing he's being committed to a mental hospital instead of going to jail.

"I’m glad he's getting help. I don't think the jail or prison would help him the right way because he didn't know what he was doing. He thought he was getting orders from the president. He also kind of thought he was the president in a mingled way," Michelle Clark said.

Michelle Clark said since her brother has started receiving treatment, he does seem to be remorseful for his actions. She said she would like to rebuild a relationship with her brother.


About the Authors:

Deven Clarke

Deven Clarke was born and raised in Brooklyn, New York. He attended Howard University in Washington, D.C., where he developed a passion for journalism after being asked to fill in as a sports anchor for the university's student-run news program.