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San Antonio substance abuse recovery program changes how it provides services during pandemic

Rise Recovery is receiving more calls for help

SAN ANTONIO – You are not alone during this pandemic.

Evita Morin, the CEO of Rise Recovery, a nonprofit in San Antonio that helps teens and young adults overcome alcohol and drug abuse, is reminding people to ask for help if they need it.

During a Q&A on Monday, Morin said the organization has received more calls for help during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“There has been such an increase in isolation that people in recovery who need community as a component of their healing are finding themselves risking relapse, some of them are relapsing. There’s a surge in overdoses nationally that is deeply impacting the treatment facilities and recovery resources in our community,” Morin said.

The recovery organization has moved to online support groups to still provide that sense of community to its clients.

Ground broken on new addiction recovery center on North Side

With school closures, no after-school programs and less court oversight, teens who are battling abuse don’t have the oversight they need.

“Now they’re in the criminal justice system and these kids that may have been gotten a slap on the hand are now receiving much more serious consequences,” Morin said.

Rise Recovery broke ground on its facility on Monday. The organization has been operating inside of local churches for the past 45 years, Morin said.

“And by having two beautiful acres of 22,000 square feet of this community resource available, we can now become that beacon of light and show people that we do exist, that we are not hidden in the halls of other places, and that recovery is available to them,” Morin said.

The facility will provide a community center, social activities and a recovery school. Rise Recovery has partnered with Anne Frank Inspire Academy for an in-school recovery pilot program which will begin this fall.

Rise Recovery is not a treatment center. It provides resources and support to maintain recovery, Morin said.

If you or a loved one needs help, you can call the help line at 210-SAY-CARE.

WATCH: Pt. 2 of Evita Morin’s interview


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