Tired of auto warranty robocalls? Here’s what you can do to stop them.

'Money it's Personal': Tips to avoid falling victim to robocalls
'Money it's Personal': Tips to avoid falling victim to robocalls

SAN ANTONIO – Are you tired of constantly getting auto warranty robocalls at all hours of the day? You’re not alone.

These types of calls may seem legitimate and may even come from your area code. But the Federal Trade Commission is warning the public about these annoying robocalls and offering tips to avoid falling victim to their scams.

Let’s identify what these types of robocalls are like:

You’ll usually receive a call containing a recorded message about your vehicle’s warranty coverage.

The recording may also mention the caller has tried contacting you via mail, or that they’ll close out your vehicle’s warranty file if you don’t extend it now.

The caller will then usually prompt you to press a number for a representative or a different key to opt-out of future calls.

But before you pick up the phone, the FTC says these types of calls are illegal and likely a scam.

The commission says the robocalls are not associated with your car dealership or manufacturer.

What these callers are trying to sell you is a service contract that could cost you hundreds, if not thousands, of dollars. The FTC says if you give up your money, you may find yourself out of luck since restrictions in the fine print won’t cover the problems with your car.

The FTC recommends the following to avoid auto warranty robocalls:

  • First, just hang up or don’t engage when a company reaches you with a robocall.
  • Next, consider using an app or device to block unwanted calls. You can also contact your carrier to see if they offer that service.
  • Finally, report the robocall by visiting Donotcall.Gov.

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