Trinity University delays start of spring semester amid omicron variant surge

Other San Antonio universities considering similar delay

SAN ANTONIO – As new coronavirus infections surge mostly due to the omicron variant, Trinity University made the decision to delay the start of spring classes, according to the school’s website.

On Wednesday, the university posted the notification which indicates the spring semester will not begin until Jan. 31, 2022. Staff will be asked to work remotely before the semester begins. Students and staff are both urged to get their booster shots ahead of the start of classes.

Trinity appears to be the first San Antonio university to delay the semester. Other universities are also considering the move.

On Wednesday, St. Mary’s University said officials are monitoring infections during Christmas break and that their Critical Incidents Response Team will continue to meet regularly ahead of the spring semester.

Similarly, Our Lady of the Lake University also indicated they are monitoring the surge as they prepare for the spring semester.

“The university will continue to follow local, state and federal guidelines and will make adjustments if necessary,” according to the school’s website. “Any updates will be posted on this page and will be communicated to the community.

The University of the Incarnate Word issued a similar message, stating it is monitoring the situation “to inform decisions about safe campus operations.”

Alamo Colleges officials also confirmed to KSAT 12 News that they are closely monitoring the surge.

Though University of Texas-San Antonio currently plans to start the semester on Jan. 18, officials told KSAT 12 News the school’s public health task force continues to evaluate conditions as that date nears.

Texas A&M San Antonio officials also said there are currently no plans to delay the spring semester but they are monitoring the situation.

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About the Author:

Fares Sabawi has been a journalist in San Antonio for four years. He has covered several topics, but specializes in crime, courts, open records and data visualization.