EXPLAINER: Why AP hasn’t called Pennsylvania

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Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

Lehigh County workers count ballots as vote counting in the general election continues, Thursday, Nov. 5, 2020, in Allentown, Pa. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

WHY AP HASN’T CALLED PENNSYLVANIA:

A close margin and a large number of outstanding votes are what’s making the Pennsylvania contest between President Donald Trump and Joe Biden too early to call.

The Democrat held a lead over Trump of more than 28,800 votes at 11:15 p.m. EST Friday, out of more than 6.5 million ballots cast — a edge of about 0.43%. State law dictates that a recount must be held if the margin between the two candidates is less than 0.5%.

The Pennsylvania secretary of state’s website said Friday that there were about 89,000 more mail ballots to count. Many were from Allegheny County, a largely Democratic area that is home to Pittsburgh, and the Democratic stronghold of Philadelphia County.

Additionally, there are potentially tens of thousands of provisional ballots that remain to be tabulated, though an exact number remained unclear. Those ballots will be counted after officials verify their eligibility to be included.

Pennsylvania is among a handful of battleground states Trump and Biden are narrowly contesting as they seek the 270 electoral votes needed to win the presidency.

Trump, who held a 675,000-vote lead early Wednesday, prematurely declared victory in the state.

“We’re winning Pennsylvania by a tremendous amount. We’re up 690,000 votes in Pennsylvania. These aren’t even close. It’s not like, ‘Oh, it’s close,’” Trump said during an appearance at the White House.