San Antonio to make late-season run at 100 degrees this week

Records could fall before front brings a cool down early next week

Above-average heat continues into the upcoming weekend, with daytime highs each afternoon climbing into the 90s. (KSAT)

As if the summer wasn’t brutal enough, Mother Nature has decided to ignore the autumnal equinox (Thursday at 8:04 p.m.) and crank up the heat this week.

After a hot start to the week with highs each afternoon climbing into the mid 90s, more toasty temperatures are expected into the upcoming weekend. The culprit for this week’s elevated temperatures: the heat-high. It disappeared in August, but instead of hitting the road for Fall, it’s opted to park itself over Texas this week.

A heat high will keep temperatures above average through the weekend. (Copyright 2022 by KSAT - All rights reserved.)

Here’s the long and short of it:

  • Humidity levels drop Thursday and Friday. That means it’ll be more of a “dry heat”.
  • The hottest temperatures are forecast to arrive Thursday and Friday afternoons, with San Antonio just shy or right at 100°. Other spots in South Texas almost certainly will climb above the century mark.
  • The record highs on Thursday (101 degrees) and Friday (99 degrees) may be challenged.
  • Should we hit 100 at San Antonio International Airport, then we would tie the record of most 100 degree days in a year (59 in 2009).
  • The weekend will still be hot, with rising humidity levels.
  • A cold front on Monday brings a slight cool down and another drop in humidity

WEATHER ON-THE-GO

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About the Author:

Justin Horne is a meteorologist and reporter for KSAT 12 News. When severe weather rolls through, Justin will hop in the KSAT 12 Storm Chaser to safely bring you the latest weather conditions from across South Texas. On top of delivering an accurate forecast, Justin often reports on one of his favorite topics: Texas history.