Frio River is at 0 flow in Concan. Images show how low the water is.

Extreme drought conditions have brought the normally-shallow river down to a puddle in some areas.

Frio River in Concan. Photo taken in June, 2022. (Pilar Newberry)

CONCAN, Texas – The Frio River is one of the gems of the Hill Country. Its spring-fed waters are perfect for wading, tubing, kayaking or even just sticking your feet in to cool off.

But these days, sticking your feet in is about all you can do. Extreme drought conditions have brought the normally-shallow river down to a puddle in some areas.

On Wednesday, the official streamflow was measured at 0.0 cubic feet per second, which basically means... the river has no flow.

Frio River is measuring at its lowest since 2011. (KSAT)

It’s the lowest measurement for the river in more than a decade. The typical average should be about 60 CFS.

“If you never saw what it looked like before, you have no idea just how bad this is,” said Susan Carouthers Sneed.

She posted photos on Facebook showing the water level which she described as “so sad.”

Below: Images of the Frio River in Garner State Park taken by Susan Carouthers Sneed.

Frio River in Garner State Park. Photo taken in June 2022. (Susan Carouthers Sneed)
Frio River in Garner State Park. Photo taken in June 2022. (Susan Carouthers Sneed)
Frio River in Garner State Park. Photo taken in June 2022. (Susan Carouthers Sneed)

The river is one of the main draws for Garner State Park in the summer. The park’s website shows an image of a family floating over the rapids in inner tubes — a photo that was clearly taken in less arid times.

Now, the park alerts that due to “extremely dry conditions” visitors are urged to use water wisely.

“Bring your own drinking water. Shower facility use may be limited,” the post reads.

Below: Images of the Frio River near Seven Bluffs taken by Pilar Newberry.

Frio River in Concan. Photo taken in June 2022. (Pilar Newberry)
Frio River in Concan. Photo taken in June 2022. (Pilar Newberry)

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About the Authors:

Julie Moreno has worked in local television news for more than 20 years. She came to KSAT as a news producer in 2000. After producing thousands of newscasts, she transitioned to the digital team in 2015. She writes on a wide variety of topics from breaking news to trending stories and manages KSAT’s daily digital content strategy.

Sarah Spivey is a San Antonio native who grew up watching KSAT. She has been a proud member of the KSAT Weather Authority Team since 2017. Sarah is a Clark High School and Texas A&M University graduate. She previously worked at KETN News. When Sarah is not busy forecasting, she enjoys hanging out with her husband and cat, and playing music.