‘We live in two Americas’: Spurs players, LeBron James sound off on police presence during US Capitol attack

Spurs-Lakers players locked arms at mid court during national anthem before game

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA - JANUARY 07: The Los Angeles Lakers and the San Antonio Spurs lock arms during the national anthem prior to a game at Staples Center on January 07, 2021 in Los Angeles, California.  NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA - JANUARY 07: The Los Angeles Lakers and the San Antonio Spurs lock arms during the national anthem prior to a game at Staples Center on January 07, 2021 in Los Angeles, California. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images) (2021 Getty Images)

LOS ANGELES – A day after rioters and supporters of President Donald Trump stormed the US Capitol, a pair of Spurs veterans and Lakers forward LeBron James spoke passionately about the events that took place in Washington, D.C. on Wednesday afternoon.

LaMarcus Aldridge said the mob violence and the lack of police presence compared to a Black Lives Matter protest “should have been a huge eye opener for everyone.”

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“If that was a group of Black people going into that building, they would have been more gunfire, probably more people dead,” Aldridge said. “You see videos of the cops taking selfies and it’s just sad. We haven’t realized how bad this is. We’re not making this up.”

The 15-year NBA veteran wondered what would have happened if the mob that stormed the Capitol were mostly made up of Black people.

“It was just crazy to see that many people storming the Capitol and people have guns drawn but don’t do anything. But you have a black person getting out of a car or leaving a store, or doing many other things that aren’t as threatening as that, then they get shot.

They get killed in many different ways, but no one came in early. No one reacted fast. It was very slow, very gentle. If you flip that and make that all black people, that story is totally different. It’s more tragic.”

Aldridge said being Black and growing up as a Black person in America is a completely “different feeling.”


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