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CPSC reports 73 deaths related to inclined infant sleepers, wants ban

SAN ANTONIO – The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission is warning parents to stop using inclined sleep products for infants, citing a new study. The agency says it has received 73 reports of infant deaths related to the products over the past 14 years. 

Federal regulators said they have received 1,108 reports of incidents related to the popular sleep products that occurred from January 2005 through June 2019.

More than 5 million inclined infant sleepers have been recalled. Consumer Reports has been calling for all such products to be recalled and removed from stores and homes.

The CPSC commissioned an independent study that concluded none of the inclined sleep products the team tested is safe for infant sleep. The study found that products with inclines of 10 degrees or less, with flat and rigid surfaces, are likely safe for infant sleep. Current infant inclined sleepers on the market typically have up to a 30-degree incline.

The study found that at steeper inclines, the design enables infants to move differently and possibly roll over, potentially suffocating when their muscles are unable to reposition their heads. Also, at steeper inclines, babies’ heads can flop forward, restricting the airway.

The CPSC has also proposed new rules for infant sleepers that would effectively eliminate all infant inclined sleepers from the market.

The government urges parents and caregivers to stop using infant sleep products that have inclined seatbacks of more than 10 degrees and not use car seats and bouncers for unsupervised sleep.

The American Academy of Pediatrics said babies should sleep on their backs on a firm, flat surface in a crib, bassinet or play yard bare of soft bedding and toys.


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