Things to keep in mind when cooking on the grill this summer

Rising temperatures can cause food safety risks

Things to keep in mind when cooking out on the grill this summer
Things to keep in mind when cooking out on the grill this summer

Summer is in full swing and more than half of American adults are proceeding with typical summer celebrations, and with those gatherings can come lots of barbecues.

Several food experts are warning Americans not to let the excitement distract them from food safety protocols, bacteria, and food poisoning.

Poorly cooked meals can quickly ruin a celebration.

According to foodsafety.gov, germs that cause food borne illness can grow rapidly in temperatures between 40 and 140°F. But in the summer, hot and humid weather can make for an ideal environment for bacteria to grow even more quickly.

When the temperature outside is above 90 degrees, food is only safe outside for one hour.

People also cook and eat outside, making it tempting to take shortcuts when it comes to food safety, and is tempting since people are away from the convenience of soap and running water.

So how should you cook meat?

Cooked chicken and other poultry needs to be at least 165 degrees. Cooked beef, pork, lamb and veal steaks and roasts need to have an internal temperatures of at least 145°F.