There is a rise in eating disorders since the pandemic started, experts say

Eating disorders have second-highest mortality rate of any psychiatric diagnosis

There is a rise in eating disorders since the pandemic started, experts say
There is a rise in eating disorders since the pandemic started, experts say

According to NPR, hotline calls to the National Eating Disorders Association are up by 70-percent to 80-percent.

For many people eating is a form of control and a coping mechanism tied to stress, experts said. Food scarcity and stockpiling behavior can trigger anxieties about eating or overeating. According to the CEO of the National Eating Disorders Association, eating disorders have a strong link to trauma.

A survey in the International Journal of Eating Disorders showed, 62-percent of people in the U.S. with anorexia said their symptoms have worsened since the pandemic started.

Some people’s symptoms worsened because they had a lack of structure, social support, and lived in a triggering environment, said Christine Peat, co-author of the study.

People with eating disorders also said working from home has also caused to binge eat food, since it’s more accessible to them during all times of the day.


About the Authors:

Gaby has been a news producer since 2019. She graduated from the University of North Texas with a Media Arts degree and previously worked at KIII-TV in Corpus Christi.

Stephanie Serna is a weekday anchor on Good Morning San Antonio and GMSA at 9 a.m. She joined the KSAT 12 News team in November 2009 as a general assignments reporter.